Home/forecasts

The Sun Flares for Cycle 25 | Solar Storm Forecast 03.19.2020

This week space weather stays relatively calm, however, we do have some nice eye-candy, both at Earth and from our Sun. This eye-candy, which includes some gorgeous views of aurora on Earth from recent solar storms & flare activity from the new bright regions on our Sun, should soothe your mind from the craziness in the world right now due to COVID-19. As for our star, two new bright regions from solar cycle 25 have emerged. One has even fired off the first long-duration flare attributed to the new solar cycle. Although this long-duration flare did not bring us a radio blackout or an Earth-directed solar storm, it nevertheless is noteworthy in that it is heralding even more firsts from the upcoming solar cycle. in addition, we also have pockets of fast solar wind that are keeping us at unsettled conditions and bringing aurora to high latitudes over the next several days. Solar flux is remaining in the low 70s, which means radio propagation will stay in the marginal range for radio propagation over the next week. GPS reception also remains good overall through this next week. Learn the details of the recent solar flare and what it means for the coming solar cycle, see some recent aurora that will ease your mind and soul, and see what else our Sun has in store this week.

Stealthy Solar Storm on its Way | Space Weather News 03.06.2020

The Sun may be spotless this week, but the Sun still gives us a show with an Earth-directed stealthy solar storm launch! Views from STEREO confirm the solar storm is at least partly Earth-directed and NASA prediction models show we could get a glancing blow from this storm late on March 7 and into March 8. This means aurora photographers at high latitudes could be in for some nice views, while photographers at mid-latitudes may only get an elusive and fleeting show. Emergency Radio operators are in luck, despite the spotless Sun, as solar flux remains in the low 70s, keeping radio propagation on Earth’s dayside in the marginal range this week. GPS users are also in luck as the weak solar storm and low solar flux mean that GPS reception should be good everywhere, except near dawn and dusk, and also near aurora. Learn the details of the coming solar storm and see what else our Sun has in store this week.

Solar Wind Pockets & Solar Orbiter Surprise | Solar Storm Forecast 02.28.2020

Space Weather has been calming down over this past week, but activity is about to pick up again. We have several small pockets of fast solar wind that will hit Earth over the next few days and bump us up to unsettled and possibly active conditions in through the weekend. Aurora photographers, especially at high latitudes should expect some nice views. However, views at mid-latitudes will likely be elusive and sporadic. Our Sun also has several new bright regions rotating into Earth view over the next few days. One of these regions might be from the new solar cycle. Expect solar flux to rise into the mid-70s by early next week, which should give a nice boost to radio propagation on Earth’s dayside. Learn the details of the coming fast solar wind, get new insights on the recent launch of the Solar Orbiter mission to study our star, and see what else our Sun has in store!

A Mini Solar Storm with a Fast Wind Chaser | Space Weather News 02.20.2020

This week our Sun gives us a surprise boost in activity as a weak solar storm conspires with some fast solar wind and bumps us up to solar storm conditions for a short while. Aurora photographers have been reporting aurora visible in the upper mid-latitudes and high latitude watchers have been greeted by some dazzling shows. With more fast solar wind on the way, high-latitudes could continue having active aurora in through the weekend. As for radio communications, the sun remains spotless so we are remaining at the low end of marginal for radio propagation. Solar flux will likely hold steady in the low 70s over this next week. At least GPS users should enjoy decent GPS reception on Earth’s dayside, but nightside reception might suffer, especially near aurora and near dawn and dusk. Learn the details of the ongoing solar storm, where and when aurora is visible, and what else our Sun has in store this week.

One Storm Down, One to Go | Solar Storm Forecast 02.05.2020

Space Weather has been calming down over the past few days since a solar storm hit Earth at the turn of the month. However, more fast solar wind is coming, which could give us another chance for aurora at high latitudes into the weekend, with views possibly extending down to mid-latitudes for a short while. Although sunspot 2757 has now rotated to the Sun’s farside, we do have two new bright regions rotating into Earth-view on the Sun’s east limb. These regions are helping to keep radio propagation on Earth’s dayside in the marginal range. Expect solar flux to remain in the low 70s this week. GPS users should continue to enjoy good GPS reception on Earth’s dayside thanks to a spotless Sun, but on Earth’s nightside, GPS reception could get a little dicey near dawn and dusk, and anywhere near aurora once the solar storm hits. Learn the details of the coming fast solar wind, catch up on aurora photos from the recent storm, and see what else our Sun has in store!

A Bright Region Pair & An Earth-Directed Solar Storm | Space Weather News 01.27.2020

This week space weather started out quietly, but got exciting fast. We have two bright regions that have emerged on the Sun. One is a cycle 24 (old cycle) sunspot that has fired an Earth-directed solar storm! The second is a cycle 25 bright region that is helping to boost the solar flux back into the mid-70s. This means radio propagation on Earth’s dayside gets a nice boost. We also have a good chance for aurora at high latitudes (and possibly even mid-latitudes) starting on January 29. Learn the details of this coming solar storm, how GPS reception and radio communication will fare this week, and see what else our Sun has in store.

Multiple Storms Launch & Martian Ice Mining: Solar Storm Forecast 01-22-2020

This week our Sun shows more signs of life by firing multiple solar storms in the past few days. Several of these have been Earth-directed, and although small, they are nonetheless a welcome sight. Along with some fast solar wind from a coronal hole hitting Earth now, these mini-storms are causing some brilliant displays of aurora at high latitudes. In addition, our Sun continues to keep the solar flux in the low 70s, which means we are remaining in the marginal range for radio propagation on Earth’s dayside. See the details of the storming this week including how it will affect GPS reception and radio communications, and in a special segment on Mars, learn how a recent scientific study on Martian ice-mining impacts planned landing sites for the first human mission to the Red Planet.

Satellites Charge as Fast Solar Wind Approaches | Space Weather News 01.13.2020

This week our Sun returns to spotless, but not before it gave us yet another new cycle sunspot, region 2756. That region has since rotated behind the Sun’s west limb, however, we still have several bright regions in Earth view so the solar flux remains in the marginal range for radio propagation. On top of this we have a small coronal hole that will be rotating through the Earth-strike zone over the next few days and sending us some fast wind. This could bring us some aurora views, possibly down to mid-latitudes briefly. Aurora views at high latitudes should last until the weekend. Since we recently had a weak solar storm hit, this means the near-Earth environment is a bit wound-up so satellites and other space traffic in and near GEO orbits have a slightly elevated risk of surface charging over the next few days. Learn the details of the coming fast solar wind, including how it will affect you, and see what else our Sun has in store!

An Earth-Directed Solar Storm & A Holy Grail | Space Weather News 01.08.2020

This week our Sun shakes things up by launching its first solar storm of the year. Considering we are still waiting for Solar Cycle 25 to arrive officially, this solar storm launch is a welcome surprise. Along with a small pocket of fast solar wind expected to arrive near coincident with the solar storm in a few days, aurora photographers might be able to catch glimpses of the aurora even down to mid latitudes for a short while. In addition to the solar storm, we have yet another solar cycle 25 sunspot in Earth-view. These sightings are becoming more the norm than the exception, which means we could see flare activity pick up again over the next few months. As it is, solar flux is creeping up to the mid-70s, with radio propagation back well into the marginal range on Earth’s dayside. GPS users should also be enjoying decent GPS/GNSS reception early in the week, but should stay away from nightside aurora and from the dawn-dusk regions, especially once the solar storm hits. learn the details of the coming solar storm, see where and when aurora might be visible, and find out what else our Sun has in store. This week also has a special deep dive into the Parker Solar Probe discovery of magnetic switchbacks in the solar wind and what it means in terms of finding the holy grail of solar physics.

A Fleeting Sunspot & A Familiar Hole | Space Weather News 12-19-2019

This week our Sun’s activity picks up a little bit. We have a small coronal hole that is rotating through the Earth-strike zone and the fast wind it is sending us is causing aurora at high latitudes. Although we have seen this coronal hole before, it is closing so the fast wind is much weaker this time around. Expect unsettled conditions over the next few days and aurora that will likely stay confined to high latitudes. In addition to the fast solar wind, we are also seeing another solar cycle 25 bright region rotating into Earth-view on the Sun’s east limb. This region has briefly emerged strongly enough to become a sunspot, but it likely wont last long enough to get an official number designation before it disappears below the Sun’s surface again. Nonetheless, it is yet another indicator of the new cycle that is nearly here! Learn details of the current fast wind hitting Earth, how the new bright region is affecting radio propagation as well as GPS reception on Earth’s dayside, and see what else our Sun has in store!

Load More Posts